Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Awareness test



Discussion in comments to avoid spoilers.

8 Comments:

Blogger Zachary Drake said...

I love stuff like this. Our brains are not generic input processors. They are optimized for accomplishing certain tasks, and it's amazing what can fall through the cracks.

8:43 PM, April 16, 2008  
OpenID jdm314 said...

That is some crappy moonwalking!

Anyway, so apparently I'm not self-aware. I may need you to explain to me how mirrors work.

Or maybe I'm not aware as in "Awareness Day." That could be a problem!

9:15 PM, April 16, 2008  
Blogger Zachary Drake said...

Yes, the art of moonwalking has declined significantly since the early 1980's, when it's most famous practitioner was at the height of his powers.

11:06 PM, April 16, 2008  
Blogger ogre said...

Yep, missed the "moonwalking" "bear."

Focus someone's attention, and then anything that fall outside of the parameters is likely to go unnoticed.

Passes by the white team? We start to look and the first filter is to ignore the black team--and the "bear" is black, so its actions aren't of interest. We miss a lot--we filter it out.

I wonder how many people would see it if they were looking for passes by the black team.

12:48 AM, April 17, 2008  
Blogger grishnash said...

This is interesting. I already knew what was going to happen even though this was my first time seeing this video. I'd seen another video identical in concept, but recorded at a different time with different people...

7:26 AM, April 17, 2008  
Anonymous bill in minneapolis said...

We certainly do not 'see' everything that is in our visual field. Facinating example of this.

"The brain has evolved meachanisms for combating data overload, allowing large rivers of data to pass along optical and cortical corridors almost entirely unassimilated, and peeling off selected data for a close careful view. In deciding what to focus on, the brain essentially shines a spotlight from place to place, a rapid, sweeping search that takes in maybe 30 or 40 objects per seconds..."

"The brain, it seems, is a master at filing gaps and making do, of compiling a cohesive portrait of reality based on a flickering view."

(NYTimes Science Section, 4/1/08)

Visual artists know that they just have to suggest something and the viewer will fill in the details.

7:45 PM, April 17, 2008  
Blogger Sarah said...

One of my favorite IM posts. So cool.

8:13 AM, April 19, 2008  
Anonymous Miguel said...

Do you follow Errol Morris's blog? Long form and fascinating.

9:11 PM, April 25, 2008  

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